A little info on lead



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Online RobertMcC

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Re: A little info on lead
« Reply #20 on: January 23, 2019, 07:10:32 AM »
Im actually on my way for blood test for lead/iron and bunch of the tests.. I went semi blind for awhile in my right eye. Found out I had rusted water pipes.

I think the risk is low shooting airguns. Where I shoot pellets and PBs. I mainly shoot powder coated lead bullets at a indoor range. ( avg 1000rds between us in 45 mins )

But for someone little,  lead exposure is higher risk. We had about 4-5 that shoots every week, find out that they had 2-3x higher lead level that they determine is normal. Like Archary and rifle nights. They got people lying on the floor, sure they got a mat but still coming in contact, the benches and such have got lead dust on it. Kids are touching it, and more subject.

Younger me, didn't worry. Now that I'm older, it's effecting me more.
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Offline DHunter

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Re: A little info on lead
« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2019, 12:42:09 AM »
The concern about lead has prompted E-waste (electronics waste) roundups where you can take old electronics equipment to be recycled so the stuff with lead-bearing solder doesn't go into the landfill and contaminate the ground water.  Well, our local landfill has many decades of electronics waste in it from before the E-waste roundups.  We get the ground-water quality report once a year with the water bill.  The lead level is one-eighth of the action level; IOW, if it got eight times as high, they'd start doing something about it.  The local landfill is not one of the suspected sources of lead in the water.  Erosion of natural deposits is though.  It's a little hard to be worried about lead pellets being left in the dirt when you see facts like that.
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Offline Wayne52

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Re: A little info on lead
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2019, 05:35:52 AM »
I'll ask my doctor at the VA what my lead level is on the 30th at the VA :D
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Online RobertMcC

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Re: A little info on lead
« Reply #23 on: January 24, 2019, 04:59:05 PM »
I'll ask my doctor at the VA what my lead level is on the 30th at the VA :D

I'll find out in a couple weeks my results.
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Offline MartyMcFly

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Re: A little info on lead
« Reply #24 on: January 25, 2019, 08:38:11 AM »
For those of you who are getting tested for lead I just wanted to point out that you should take into consideration the age of your home and the industry that you have worked in when interpreting your results.

Many older homes have lead paint and some even have lead pipes (less likely). The paint itself is not a problem until it starts to chip or becomes too dry and turns into a powder, which then makes it very easy to become airborn on the natural air currents in the home.

For those who have worked in manufacturing or lived in an area that was not too far from smelters or mines there is a higher probability that you already have higher levels of lead from those sources.

Last thing to remember is that lead is a naturally occurring ore, you may live in an area that has higher levels of this stuff naturally. Furthermore, leaded gas was once popular which makes it more likely that areas near high traffic zones may have higher levels.

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Online RobertMcC

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Re: A little info on lead
« Reply #25 on: January 25, 2019, 09:47:30 AM »
For those of you who are getting tested for lead I just wanted to point out that you should take into consideration the age of your home and the industry that you have worked in when interpreting your results.

Many older homes have lead paint and some even have lead pipes (less likely). The paint itself is not a problem until it starts to chip or becomes too dry and turns into a powder, which then makes it very easy to become airborn on the natural air currents in the home.

For those who have worked in manufacturing or lived in an area that was not too far from smelters or mines there is a higher probability that you already have higher levels of lead from those sources.

Last thing to remember is that lead is a naturally occurring ore, you may live in an area that has higher levels of this stuff naturally. Furthermore, leaded gas was once popular which makes it more likely that areas near high traffic zones may have higher levels.

-Marty

Thanks, but I know where my lead is coming from. Every week at a shooting range where 10-11 of us are using powder coated lead bullets. And between us shooting about a 1000rds in a span of 45 mins. At the time with not up to par ventilation. Not enough negative pressure to draw the smoke away fast enough. And the ones with higher, are ones that cast. 

I also replaced all the pipes in the house, and its on a well.
  • Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia, CANADA

Online RobertMcC

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Re: A little info on lead
« Reply #26 on: February 10, 2019, 11:05:35 AM »
I got my blood work back. Didn't have much time to go into detail about it. He was going to call a specialist. To see were we go now. So told me to call Monday. It was elevated, but doubt Ill need to get a dialysis to remove the lead from my blood.

So just a history. Im 34 years old, Ive been shooting since I was 15, mainly in indoor ranges. I was a IPSC shooter, and the last 2 years, I took up PPC with a ventilation system that wasn't up to par. And reload. I shoot about 500 pellets a week.

I do a little smelting, But always outside with proper P100 respirator, and full overalls.
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Offline CENTURION

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Re: A little info on lead
« Reply #27 on: February 10, 2019, 08:36:05 PM »
I sometimes use the steel traps, the steel plate targets definitely fragment pellets out the front of the trap on the floor, I actually sweep every time I shoot. I should probably switch to lead free for these type targets indoors. I was always concerned on the high velocity guns indoors blowing out lead dust. Problem with the lead free pellets is they are all so light, not a good thing for the springers.

Offline OneGear

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Re: A little info on lead
« Reply #28 on: February 10, 2019, 11:59:15 PM »


I will have to look up that post and read it. We could have lead dust issues after the pellet is shot but a lot of air guns seem to employ a moderator or LDC. How much dust is created is at question. Then you can determine say my attic range where I shoot currently 100 or so rounds then I am done. I may have more harmful exposure to the insulation than the lead. From what I understand in my case the insulation will stay in my lungs but the lead will make it to my brain and it could take a million pellets shot in my attic range to get any effect but after 100 hours I could have respiratory issues from inhaling fiberglass.



I would be REALLY surprised if there was any significant risk associated with shooting air guns.
Maybe PB's, due to the make-up of the primer, and the exposive process required for expulsion of the bullet.

I agree.  And even regarding firearms, I'd need to know alot more about their byproducts of combustion at the pressures experienced before I'd start thinking about long term effects.

An open window and a fan can go a long way when indoor air quailty is in question.

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I want to thank the OP for sharing this.  More widespread knowledge of the subject benefits all.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2019, 12:03:05 AM by OneGear »
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Online RobertMcC

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Re: A little info on lead
« Reply #29 on: February 11, 2019, 10:04:53 AM »
Now when I was researching. Airguns were never directly mentioned in all the check lists.

Quote
Do you have hobbies such as target shooting, preparing lead shot or fishing sinkers, stained glass, lead pottery making

But I would assume they fall under target shooting.

Here a thing I found, more directed about airgun use.

https://www.usashooting.org/library/Youth_Development/HS_and_College_Programs/LeadMgtGuideUSASCMP.pdf
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Offline CENTURION

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Re: A little info on lead
« Reply #30 on: February 11, 2019, 06:40:38 PM »
Good info, the report states a few time guns rated at 600 fps or below, even low end gas ram guns are doing 1000 plus fps, I actually stopped shooting  my powerful guns indoors, they would almost vaporize a pellet when impacting a spinner. I think for indoor shooting I am going to use the alloy pellets only.

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