adjusting for wind



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Offline 1911Deven

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adjusting for wind
« on: September 11, 2018, 01:59:25 AM »
is chairgun good for wind? i am thinking of buying a cheap wind meter so i can use the wind feature. any recommendations for a cheap wind meter?
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Offline 1911Deven

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Re: adjusting for wind
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2018, 02:14:13 AM »
i am thinking of getting a 20$ Proster.



Proster Wind Meter Handheld Digital Anemometers Air Flow Meter Thermometer with LCD Backlight
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Offline Roadworthy

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Re: adjusting for wind
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2018, 12:18:41 PM »
Wind is an interesting thing.  The wind where you're standing is not necessarily traveling at the same speed as the wind at your target.  Between the two points wind can be moving at different speeds or even in different directions.  Knowing the wind speed at one finite point is exactly that - knowing the wind speed at that one point at that point in time.
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Offline bandg

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Re: adjusting for wind
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2018, 01:11:22 PM »
Exactly right, Thomas.  I shoot PB's to 600 yards regularly at my local range and have shot a few 1000 yard matches over the years.  Trajectory for any firearm or air gun is the easy part and can be pretty well nailed down, especially if you have a range finder.  Wind is a completely different parameter that you will never completely overcome.  I've often seen wind moving opposite direction (or even upwards or downwards) downrange while only detecting a crosswind at firing line.  And as you note, speed is completely variable as well as direction.  I've also seen it shift from one direction to opposite downrange with no change noted at the firing line.  Luckily it is not as likely at short air gun ranges but as people begin to shoot further and further with the air guns it will become more of an issue.
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Offline Yogi

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Re: adjusting for wind
« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2018, 08:36:22 PM »
i am thinking of getting a 20$ Proster.



Proster Wind Meter Handheld Digital Anemometers Air Flow Meter Thermometer with LCD Backlight

At the end of the day, you need to be able to estimate the strength of the wind.  Anemometer are great at checking your estimates.
But you need to know what 5mph and 10 mph and 15 mph feels like.  When in woods, the wind will vary greatly between you and the target, open plains, not so much... ;)

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Offline Motorhead

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Re: adjusting for wind
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2018, 12:17:19 PM »
Like the old term ... KENTUCKY WINDAGE. correction for the wind is a skill one builds that in field work becomes pretty much an instinct.
While charts and grafts give you cause & effect on paper you can read and digest ... ACTUAL SHOOTING and applying it w/o looking at said charts is the real hat trick.  ;)
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Offline dan_house

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Re: adjusting for wind
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2018, 04:23:21 PM »
When I got my wind meter I walked around my practice field and watched the meter, then how the veg and leaves are reacting in that speed of breeze. Got to the point where I could call 3, 5 or 12mph, and direction most of the time.....

In other places, not so well. What I did then was walk around the match grounds( but not on the course) and tried to correlate the speed to how the local leaves grass etc acted. Assuming you have vegetation etc that can act as a speed/dirction indicator.

ITs a great idea, and the meter can teach you a lot, but as Motorhead noted, its no substitute for lots of range time in a variety of conditions
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Offline Steelontarget

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Re: adjusting for wind
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2018, 05:45:06 PM »
Exactly right, Thomas.  I shoot PB's to 600 yards regularly at my local range and have shot a few 1000 yard matches over the years.  Trajectory for any firearm or air gun is the easy part and can be pretty well nailed down, especially if you have a range finder.  Wind is a completely different parameter that you will never completely overcome.  I've often seen wind moving opposite direction (or even upwards or downwards) downrange while only detecting a crosswind at firing line.  And as you note, speed is completely variable as well as direction.  I've also seen it shift from one direction to opposite downrange with no change noted at the firing line.  Luckily it is not as likely at short air gun ranges but as people begin to shoot further and further with the air guns it will become more of an issue.
I also shoot PBs out to long distances.  Since I've started shooting air rifles more in the last couple of years, it has made me more cognizant of the wind.  I feel like shooting air rifles on days with a little wind has made me a better long range shooter with PBs.
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Offline bandg

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Re: adjusting for wind
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2018, 01:10:57 PM »
Agree with that, Mike.  But at air gun distances you are much less likely to see noticeably different wind speeds and certainly much less likely to see different directions of wind.  But in general I agree that any shooting does help one learn to observe and estimate wind.
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Offline Steelontarget

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Re: adjusting for wind
« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2018, 01:56:05 PM »
Agree with that, Mike.  But at air gun distances you are much less likely to see noticeably different wind speeds and certainly much less likely to see different directions of wind.  But in general I agree that any shooting does help one learn to observe and estimate wind.
My Beeman R9 in .177 caliber spits out a 10.3 grain Baracudda Match pellet at 785 fps.  The zero distance for my rifle is 30 yards.  At that distance the drift for a 5 mph cross wind is .8 inches. 

I have an HW95 in the same caliber and the same pellet is moving a little slower out the muzzle at 772 fps.  The drift at 30 yards for a 5 mph crosswind for a slower moving pellet is .9 inches.

For those of us that like to seek perfection when zeroing a rifle a slight breeze can be frustrating.  As you know there are times when you cannot feel any wind from where you are shooting but it exists down range. 

At the range that I am shooting at now, I notice the dust kick up behind the target paper when I shoot.  I've learned that when the dust kicks up and doesn't drift to one side AND if
I don't feel any wind when taking the shot then my result on target is valid.  It is valid from the standpoint that there was probably no wind acting upon the pellet. 

On the other hand, when I make a shot and I see dust move to the side then I know that the wind is indeed acting on it, even though I didn't feel or see anything else indicating a crosswind.  The dust moving in a left or right direction has told me that I can discount that shot in evaluating my grouping to set the zero for the rifle.

This has helped me immensely with zeroing the rifle and evaluating its accuracy.

On the HW95, I have a cheap 4X leapers scope on it.  The Mil-Dots are not a one mil value.  The spacing is three mils.  Normally that would be an undesirable feature.  However, once I did the mil-dot math for three mils, I have discovered the fun of shooting an air rifle at soup cans at 100 yards!  I've done this with my Diana K98 and Beeman R1.

The HW95 has a drop of 29.6 inches from a 30 yard zero to 100 yards or 8.2 mils.  The drift for a 5 mph crosswind at 100 yards is a whopping 10.9 inches or 3 mils!  I have yet to determine how much change in elevation I need for various headwinds and tailwinds.  So it's by SWAG that I determine how much to aim up or down for a head wind or tail wind. 

I shoot the air rifles off a benched bag when shooting at the 100 yard soup can.   On a calm day I hit the target about 75% of the time.

This is with a .22LR not an air rifle but I produced a video of shooting at a cow bell at 300 yards.  It's a boring video unless you like long range shooting.  So I won't be offended if anyone decides to only watch a little of the video.  The idea that I try to enforce with this video is the effect of the wind on the diminutive .22LR at that distance. 

Whether it is with a PB or an air gun, I've learned more about shooting on windy days than on ones that are calm.  One of these days I'll make a video of shooting a springer at 100 yards.

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