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Author Topic: So I got a new BSA Goldstar in .22, is a .22 not suitable for target shooting?  (Read 155 times))

Offline PG in San Diego

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Target shooting Newby here. Bear with me, its kinda a whiny post and a couple of questions.

So I got this killer deal this Christmas on a like new BSA Goldstar (Under $500) because it had a jammed magazine and leaked. Come to find out it was just the mag release not disengaged. The mag just came out. Anyways, its a gorgous rifle. I was so excited to finally get a Goldstar that is normally way outside my price range. I had these dreams to start going to shooting matches with it only to find out that everyone recommends a .177, not the .22 version I had. What a bummer. So a couple of questions...

Why is a .22 less suitable for target shooting than a .177?

Why do companies offer a .22 if its not competative for any target matches?

Where can I buy a .177 barrel and probe, or anybody have a .177 Goldstar action to swap, Id throw in $$$

Thanks for letting me rant and taking the time to explain it all to me...

Philip





 
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Offline WildCJ5

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Just sell it to me. You already owe me money. 🤪
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Offline Motorhead

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Target shooting ... Well
Larger the diameter of projectile, easier does a hole in paper break a line either to advantage or disadvantage.  On metal , say field target the larger diameter with strike on the edge of the KZ creating a split easier than a smaller diameter.

Also there are in Air Gun target shooting LIMITS on FPE ( Foot Pounds Energy ) in certain classes, which ... as caliber increases so does the pellets weight. heavier a pellet SLOWER it must be shot to stay within the power limitations.

You certainly can shoot a .22 or a .20 in a class where .177 has the most advantage, just learn the accepted limitations and scoring cost of doing so.
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Offline PG in San Diego

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Just sell it to me. You already owe me money. 🤪

The money I owe you is in the mail. I just cant remember if I put a stamp on it.   ;D
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Offline PG in San Diego

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Target shooting ... Well
Larger the diameter of projectile, easier does a hole in paper break a line either to advantage or disadvantage.  On metal , say field target the larger diameter with strike on the edge of the KZ creating a split easier than a smaller diameter.

Also there are in Air Gun target shooting LIMITS on FPE ( Foot Pounds Energy ) in certain classes, which ... as caliber increases so does the pellets weight. heavier a pellet SLOWER it must be shot to stay within the power limitations.

You certainly can shoot a .22 or a .20 in a class where .177 has the most advantage, just learn the accepted limitations and scoring cost of doing so.

Thank you, Scott. It never occurred to me that there was that much difference in a .177 and .22, which tells me that there is more to target shooting than focusing on the AO and taking the shot. I see there are some resources at the top of the page, .........I have lots to learn.
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Offline ac12

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For competitive 10 meter target shooting, .177 is specified in the rules.

One reason for this is "standardization."
As Scott said, the larger pellet makes a larger hole. 
This is specifically why MANY years ago, pistol shooters would use a .45acp to shoot BOTH the center fire and 45 stages.  The .45 made a larger hole than a .32 bullet.  If your shot was "close" to the ring line, the .45 might cut the ring, and you get the higher score, whereas the .32 would not cut the ring.
So, the same size pellet means no one gets an "unfair" advantage, by using larger pellet to cut a larger hole.


In the case of your gun, another is for the range. 
Different competitions and ranges have their own MAX power rules.
The primary reason is to not damage the range.
Example, the trap that is used for 10m shooting is not made to handle HIGH POWER guns.  You could damage or destroy the trap.  Or worse, go right through the trap, out the back and hit something.
I understand it is similar for field target, where a HIGH power gun could damage the metal targets.

Now as for why a .22 over a .177.
Impact.
A .22 pellet has more mass than a .177 pellet.  So it impacts harder (at similar velocity).  The FPE that Scott mentioned.
There is an old hunter saying .22 for fur and .177 for feathers.  So your hunting target is also a factor in caliber selection.
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Offline ac12

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The .22 might have an advantage over .177 when shooting silhouette.
The larger .22 pellet would "just" hit on the "close" shots were the .177 would miss. 
And the .22 pellet has more mass to knock over the silhouette, on a glancing hit.
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Offline PG in San Diego

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The .22 might have an advantage over .177 when shooting silhouette.
The larger .22 pellet would "just" hit on the "close" shots were the .177 would miss. 
And the .22 pellet has more mass to knock over the silhouette, on a glancing hit.

From what I am now reading, Folks are saying something about the .22 is at a disadvantage because it has a more loopy trajectory than the .177 with a flatter trajectory. I guess the .22 makes it harder to determine holdover/under?

But what you are saying makes sense, plus it probably would be better in windy conditions?

Thanks for your help...


Philip
Philip
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Offline Hoosier Daddy

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The Target Match Gates here on GTA have targets for both .177 and for .22.
  All the regular season matches and the off season casual match.  ;)

Beautiful gun Phil!
I don't need THERAPY.. I just need to shoot an AIRGUN.

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"Shoot safe and have fun!"