My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast



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Offline SagaciousKJB

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My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« on: June 28, 2017, 07:27:11 AM »
Well, I just wanted to share my experience doing my second tuning on an airgun ever. I got started with a B19 clone, and used Gene's guides, not to mention a lot of Roadworthy's patience :P  Anyway, I've been putting off tuning up the Silver Kodiak for a long time, so long ago I bet the very helpful member that sent me the spare parts doesn't even remember sending them to me. But to him I'm very appreciative for that and all the information working on the Kodiak.  This is one great community, and I'm sad that I only have the time to enjoy it and my air guns ever so often.

I want to run down just a basic history of the rifle.  Kind of its "life story" I guess you could say.  Sometime around late '14 or '15 I saw it on the shelf at Wally world, and I recognized it as a clone of a Beeman RS2--or so I thought--and the price was just right at an even $99.99; I had the cash, and I'd always wanted to try a springer, so I picked it up mostly on a whim. I'm glad I took it out to the local shooting hole, because it sure did diesel like crazy for what seemed like the first couple hundred shots. It sounded just like a rifle going off for the very first shots, and not just a .22 LR; I don't shoot a lot of powder burners, and it didn't make my ears ring, but hearing the echo of the sonic crack echo off the canyon walls made me think, "What did I buy here?" Never expected the recoil, and I swear it was actually more than my .22 LR.

Anyway, about 6 or 7 tins of 500 pellets later, it got got a lot more quiet. Maybe even too quiet, and it just kind of sounded like, "Doink!" every time it shot. It was still getting the job done, but I had the time and the parts, and it's been on my to-do list since last summer.  It wasn't exactly giving me the best groups in the world, but I'd gotten pretty familiar with it, and could plink shotgun shells at 50 yards, using the included 4x32 scope it came with. Not too shabby, but the trigger really left a lot to be desired, and the scope-stop they screwed into the tube had gotten so messed up that the screw bent up, and stripped when I tried to remove it. To be honest I was kind of just curious to see what that kind of wear did on the inside.  Which seems as good a transition for this picture as any...

You can see here all the debris from the machining had smashed into the face of the piston seal. I didn't get a picture of it, but the face of the compression chamber was basically imprinted with the outline of the seal and the screw that held it. I decided I'd need to polish that up.



Compression chamber after polishing it up:
http://i.imgur.com/KyMuN1P.jpg

Basically what I did was I took a long wooden dowel I bought from a crafts store, and I then glued a piece of 220 grit sandpaper to it, and tore it off along the outline of the dowel so it had a flat face.  Then, on the other side of the dowel, I drilled a pilot hole and then screw in a regularly phillips head wood screw. The pilot hole was to keep the dowel from expanding due to the screw being added, and then I could just use my drill with a phillips head to turn the dowel and polish the face of the compression chamber as it spins.

I did basically the same thing with the rest of the tube walls, but after having taped some sandpaper onto the the dowel.  I accomplished this by first adding a layer of duct tape to the dowel and let it get kind of "ruffled", and then I turned the tape around and added another layer down the dowel with the sticky side facing outward.  The first layer and its roughed texture ensured the outward facing layer wouldn't slip off the dowel as it turns and enters the compression tube, and then it was just a matter of wrapping the sandpaper around the tape and spinning the dowel with the screw head while slowly letting gravity pull it down; for the most part though, I just let it sit at the face of the compression chamber since that's where most of the slide runs on anyway. I left the sandpaper on the end of the dowel that the pistol seal strikes at 220 grit, but the walls of the tube I went up to 320 grit. There wasn't really a big reason for that other than I didn't want to glue on a new piece of 320 grit onto the end of the dowel... Yeah I know, but I didn't have glue and felt like this area was subject enough to as much abuse that a 320 grit finish would last long anyway. I'm relatively certain that whatever machining they used to make it in the factory was a lot more coarse than 220 grit, so it will be an improvement nonetheless.



Beyond that, I simply deburred a lot of the hard edges on the cocking slot and the opening for the trigger group. On my first tune job ever with a B19, I did this with needle files and that was a chore; a dremel made much easier work of this, but it still takes a while.  They do seem to harden this steel a bit, so I used the diamond bits. Managed to only skate the compression tube surface once.  Oh well, it doesn't need to be pretty.




The piston itself needed a little TLC.  Somehow, somewhere along the line, the cocking arm had left a deep gouge in the runner-slot for it. This just bothered the heck out of me, so I decided I'd give it a nice 320 grit finish, and put a lot of molly there, as well as deburr the edges of the cocking slot that were extremely rough.




Beyond that, I sanded the face where the piston seal is seated with a 600 grit hone ( sorry forgot to take pictures ), and then polished this end of the piston that follows with a 320 grit sand paper. It's kind of interesting to me how much attention to detail was actually paid to this piston.  That last inch of finer metal has an even smaller 1/4" band that is very flatly machined, but the overall majority of it is coarsely cut. Well mabe that's not so special, but this is only  my second tune up job, I'm still interested to see the different parts.



I did add one little modification, and this was a very easy thing to do given that the Kodiak already had a screw for the stop.  Well, it was a little more difficult for me given that I'd broken that screw off, but I decided that a big hole like my B19 had would serve well as a new scope stop. After all I wanted to put the new CenterPoint 4-16x40 scope that I got on there instead of the old combo-included 4x32--which to be honest served me really well and wasn't a bad scope in my eyes. But, again...  Not every experienced here.



Well, I didn't really want to do too much work to the barrel forks. They are held in by some interesting looking washers. They're a little hard to describe, but to make a long story short they'd broken in over time in such a way that I didn't really want to disturb the metal too much. However, there was some really nasty burrs present, and after I honed these down a little a really noticed the rough machining on this section.  Up until now I'd been pretty pleased with the manufacturing quality of this rifle, but I could tell this is definitely where they were cutting corners.  I suppose it makes sense, this level of cutting probably chews up more end-mills than other parts. I just decided to put a healthy coat of molly paste and call it good. But check out the size of that gouge...  Yeesh.



Lastly, but certainly not least, is the trigger modifcation. So, basically, you can make a night and day difference with this trigger by removing exactly ONE c-clip, and a little piece of garbage they never should have included that looks like this...



Okay, I don't know what the point of this thing was, I think some lawyer insist they add it, but essentially this is what makes this a "mock" 2-stage trigger.  Now, I'll be honest..  I didn't figure this out myself, and I owe a lot of mention to another person (I'll mention them here later ) that really pulled this trigger group apart.  In any case, the revelation is that it's really just a 1-stage trigger, and this little devil does nothing but add unnecessary pull tension on your trigger.  Pop that sucker off and it's already a huge difference. Again I wasn't thinking of pictures before doing all this, so here is a picture of the trigger group with this piece removed. You'll notice the pin in the very lower left-hand portion of the trigger group on yours is missing from mine. There's also a set-screw and a spring there.  Once you pop the C-clip and bolt holding it there off, take the screw and out and remove the spring, you're golden.



However, being the ambitious type, I bit off a little more than I could chew. I decided that in addition to some helpful hints posted by Dave99, I'd also polish the "intermediate sears". Nothing fancy, just a 600 grit finish.  Couldn't hurt, right?  Well, not sure what happened, I'll get to that later, but if you're going to mess with those be sure you don't leave ANY burrs on them.  I'm just lucky I have a small background in machine tech otherwise I'd never thought to deburr them, but still if I hadn't touched them in the first place I wouldn't have the problem.  The 600 grit finish really didn't do that much anyway; not as far as the pull tension amount is concerned, it just made the motion feel a little more glassy. Bottom line is I think I did more harm than good at this juncture, but removing the spring and that stupid tension fork is a no-brainer.

Okay well, the proof of workmanship is in the results right?  Welll I hope not...

Let's start with the before.



Top two targets are from my Vantage, one using Crosman Premier Hollow Points on the left, and on the right using Crosman Premier Ultra Mags on the right.  The bottom target is from the Kodiak post-tune, using Crosman Premier Hollow Points in .22.

Well, so here's where the problems with the trigger modification started.  Everything was great at first, very smooth. Then, something started happening where it was getting stiffer and stiffer, and finally I couldn't even tell the difference between the safety being on or not at times.  Anyway, as I said before, the solution ( other than not messing with them ) turned out to be deburring the sears, and I also added some molly paste for good measure.

Okay, well, so that should mean my groups tightened up a whole lot right?  Wellllll... Just, no.

Here's 25 yards, something like 27 shots, and a 2" wide target. Well... At least it's zero'd, for a 4" group that is.  Honestly I'm not sure if it's a rifle problem, a shooter problem, or a pellet problem.  But I did manage to shoot this group at 15 yards.  Which, I mean, I don't feel is anything to brag about, but I really wasn't grouping much better before. Eh, a tune-job can't fix lousy shooting I guess.



However, I will say one thing...  I have made a lot of creepy one-shot, one-bulls-eye shots with this thing since. It's almost like a hole-in-one shot in golf, except I've made at least three in the last few days.  I didn't think to take pictures of the first few, just a fluke anyway right....  But this one, it was so perfect, and it has nothing to do with the tune-job or my  marksmanship, but come on...  1 .22 pellet, 1 1/4" bulls-eye, and 1 shot... I know you guys find it as visually appealing as I do.





Remington Vantage NP .177 (JM molly paste, JM Seal, GRT-III trigger blade and polished sears, polished and buttoned piston, brass pivot washer mod, CPHP 4-16x40AO)

Beeman RS2 Silver Kodiak X2 .177/.22(JM molly paste and tar, polished sears, trigger over-travel stop, custom scope stop, polished and buttoned piston, included 4x32 scope)

Offline SagaciousKJB

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2017, 07:39:16 AM »
The one thing that's bothering me now, is this darn scope. The objective bell is SO close to the tube that these protruding portions sometimes come in contact when I adjust the objective. As you can see my solution was basically to try to file them down, but that was when it was on the Vantage. Now that it's on on the Kodiak, they're coming in to contact again, and so I have to get them sanded down.  Which there was a faster way of doing this than a file, I think my dremel might be coming into play again.

Beyond that, I can't think of what else to do for a tube-up job.  The barrel fork area, while rough, is solid and has no play so I think I'd rather just leave it. One modification I did was to the retaining pins for the trigger group and but-cap.  Because of the knurled ends, you have to punch these out with a pin; well, not anymore, because I fixed them up in a drill bit and sanded them flat so now I can push them out with my fingers. Should make it easier to work on in the future.

I'm sure that I missed or over-looked some improvement that could have been made, but I think I did a pretty good job on the basic tune-up part. JM heavy tar on the part of the spring that goes into the piston, clear tar on the guides, molly paste on the piston and just on the edges of the seal. I also put some molly on the top hat, and sanded the ends of the springs to fit more flush. Just the basics covered in Charlie's guides.

Looking forward to getting re-adjusted to the trigger, and I think it's about all settled in now after a couple hundred shots, but I need to find some pellets it likes. Honestly, I think it could just be my own skill level preventing me from getting great groups with it, but as far as plinking goes I can hit some pretty small targets with it at ease.




Acknowledgements, thanks and links to resources I used:

Jeff aka Privateer for his awesome thread, help and the spare parts. This has everything you need to know about breaking down the Kodiak.

http://www.gatewaytoairguns.org/GTA/index.php?topic=64509.0

Dave99's write up on the trigger was totally indispensable, very thorough, and very appreciated. The diagrams and pictures made working on this trigger a breeze

https://www.gatewaytoairguns.org/GTA/index.php?topic=114058.msg1097361#msg1097361



Remington Vantage NP .177 (JM molly paste, JM Seal, GRT-III trigger blade and polished sears, polished and buttoned piston, brass pivot washer mod, CPHP 4-16x40AO)

Beeman RS2 Silver Kodiak X2 .177/.22(JM molly paste and tar, polished sears, trigger over-travel stop, custom scope stop, polished and buttoned piston, included 4x32 scope)

Offline Dave99

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2017, 08:40:15 AM »
One modification I did was to the retaining pins for the trigger group and but-cap.  Because of the knurled ends, you have to punch these out with a pin; well, not anymore, because I fixed them up in a drill bit and sanded them flat so now I can push them out with my fingers. Should make it easier to work on in the future.

LOL! Different strokes for different folks :) 
I had been considering ADDING some MORE grip to those pins!  Mine only needed a light tap to unseat.  Bothered me to think that all the spring compression was held on those, and that if the wood wore on the stock in that spot, the pins could slip under full spring pressure.  Even assembling, I liked having them gripped in place as I released the spring compressor to let the pre-load settle back on them.  But I'm not very dextrous.  If there are three parts to fit together, I can pretty much count on running out of fingers to keep everything aligned until it's all settled :)

Enjoy!
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Offline SagaciousKJB

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2017, 03:39:15 PM »
One modification I did was to the retaining pins for the trigger group and but-cap.  Because of the knurled ends, you have to punch these out with a pin; well, not anymore, because I fixed them up in a drill bit and sanded them flat so now I can push them out with my fingers. Should make it easier to work on in the future.

LOL! Different strokes for different folks :) 
I had been considering ADDING some MORE grip to those pins!  Mine only needed a light tap to unseat.  Bothered me to think that all the spring compression was held on those, and that if the wood wore on the stock in that spot, the pins could slip under full spring pressure.  Even assembling, I liked having them gripped in place as I released the spring compressor to let the pre-load settle back on them.  But I'm not very dextrous.  If there are three parts to fit together, I can pretty much count on running out of fingers to keep everything aligned until it's all settled :)

Enjoy!

Heh yeah I have to watch it now to make sure that I keep the tube up right or they can fall out of place, but I have the plastic stock and wasn't too worried about it wearing or letting them pop out. If I had to do it again I'd probably just sand the knurls down only a little bit. I just didn't like how hard to I had to hit them to punch them out, made it hard to figure out when the spring was or wasn't compressed enough to get them back in without peening them in with a hammer. I just frankly didn't want to try that, so sanding it was!

Honestly the biggest piece of trouble I had with this was getting the barrel back on. The pivot bushing in the barrel just didn't want to line up with the holes in the barrel forks UNLESS the barrel was at a 90 degree angle to the tube.  Well, that's all fine and dandy, except that it's impossible to get the barrel at a 90 to the compression tube and then still put the cocking-mechanism into the slot.  Then, if you leave the cocking arm in the slot, you can't bend the barrel to 90 without compressing the spring.  So I did the stupidest thing, and compressed the spring down using an allen-wrench in the pivot, then quickly put the bolt in and closed the barrel.  Crazily nerve-wracking and unsafe...

What I SHOULD have done ( and did the second time ) was I took the barrel out.  That way I could clamp onto the front of the barrel housing without having to remove it or the cocking slot at all.  So I lucked out that this was an interchangeable barrel.  I really like this aspect of my B19 more, because it has the dual pivots on the linkage that allows you to pivot the barrel without compressing the spring. That's definitely something I'll have to keep in mind for future airgun tune ups.
Remington Vantage NP .177 (JM molly paste, JM Seal, GRT-III trigger blade and polished sears, polished and buttoned piston, brass pivot washer mod, CPHP 4-16x40AO)

Beeman RS2 Silver Kodiak X2 .177/.22(JM molly paste and tar, polished sears, trigger over-travel stop, custom scope stop, polished and buttoned piston, included 4x32 scope)

Offline SagaciousKJB

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2017, 03:48:29 PM »
Just realized I didn't put the right pictures in! Here is a pic of the compression-chamber face where the seal sits, and the deburr of the trigger group slot.

I like the dowel-drill sanding tool.  In the future I might attach the end to a saws-all and that way I can get a good cross-hatch.  Buuuut for now elbow grease works fine for that.

Remington Vantage NP .177 (JM molly paste, JM Seal, GRT-III trigger blade and polished sears, polished and buttoned piston, brass pivot washer mod, CPHP 4-16x40AO)

Beeman RS2 Silver Kodiak X2 .177/.22(JM molly paste and tar, polished sears, trigger over-travel stop, custom scope stop, polished and buttoned piston, included 4x32 scope)

Offline DanD

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2017, 06:44:15 PM »
The one thing that's bothering me now, is this darn scope. The objective bell is SO close to the tube that these protruding portions sometimes come in contact when I adjust the objective.
Have you considered raising the scope by putting shim material like aluminum or plastic between the bottom mounts and the scope tube? 
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Offline SagaciousKJB

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2017, 07:01:04 PM »
The one thing that's bothering me now, is this darn scope. The objective bell is SO close to the tube that these protruding portions sometimes come in contact when I adjust the objective.
Have you considered raising the scope by putting shim material like aluminum or plastic between the bottom mounts and the scope tube?

Yeah I was thinking about that, but I wasn't really sure about how that would effect how well the rings were gripping the scope.
Remington Vantage NP .177 (JM molly paste, JM Seal, GRT-III trigger blade and polished sears, polished and buttoned piston, brass pivot washer mod, CPHP 4-16x40AO)

Beeman RS2 Silver Kodiak X2 .177/.22(JM molly paste and tar, polished sears, trigger over-travel stop, custom scope stop, polished and buttoned piston, included 4x32 scope)

Offline SagaciousKJB

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2017, 04:55:39 AM »
Okay, well, today was interesting.  I have bad news, and then I have some more bad news.

Well, so, worst things first... It bump fires. Past that, even after I set the adjustment screw to take out a lot of the creep, it seems to have just kind of..  Well, crept back in. Over a few hundred shots, it started having that familiar two-stage feel.  Which I guess isn't such a bad thing, because I tested it for a bump fire again and it didn't happen, but tells me that the adjustment screw for travel needs some loc-tite on it. I'm going to take it down, measure how many threads are on the other side now, take the screw out, loc-tite it, and then turn it back in  and get it to the same amount of threads. I'll have to fine-tune it again I'm sure, but at least then it won't change, and I should have found the sweet spot between dangerous and as short a pull this trigger can get.

Otherwise, it's still just grouping miserably. All these were at 25 yards, with .177 CPHP or CPUM, and .22 CPHP.  I think I need to try something other than Crosman fodder, it's just kind of a waste of a tune-job. I'm just hoping that it is a problem with it not liking these pellets and not something else.

The best I could muster with .22... 3" targets, 1/4" bulls-eye


The Ultra Mags before zero...



The Ultra Mags after zero... (some misses not shown)



The CPHP after zero'ing with the Ultra Mags...




SO yeah, I am thinking about trying some new pellets.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 04:59:36 AM by SagaciousKJB »
Remington Vantage NP .177 (JM molly paste, JM Seal, GRT-III trigger blade and polished sears, polished and buttoned piston, brass pivot washer mod, CPHP 4-16x40AO)

Beeman RS2 Silver Kodiak X2 .177/.22(JM molly paste and tar, polished sears, trigger over-travel stop, custom scope stop, polished and buttoned piston, included 4x32 scope)

Offline Hoosier Daddy

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2017, 07:05:39 AM »
Quote
The best I could muster with .22... 3" targets, 1/4" bulls-eye

In all seriousness Saga... that top bull isn't bad for a $98 Walmart gun at 25 yards.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 07:08:49 AM by Hoosier Daddy »
Pistols
Crosman: PC77, 1740
Benjiman H9A

Rifles
Air Arms: S400-SL Carbine FAC
Beeman: RS2 Silver Kodiak,
Benjamin: 312, 342, 392P, 392PA, Maximus
Crosman: Genesis NP .22, Quest 1000X, Raven, 2nd & 3rd var 160's
Feinwerkbau: FWB 300S
Gamo: Recon
SAG: AR2078-B, QB58
Sheridan: C Blue Streak, C9 Blue Streak, Model F Co2
Xisico: XS60C .22, Sentry 702-3 .22

Proud Member of F.U.G.L.Y.

Offline SagaciousKJB

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #9 on: June 30, 2017, 05:21:21 PM »
Quote
The best I could muster with .22... 3" targets, 1/4" bulls-eye

In all seriousness Saga... that top bull isn't bad for a $98 Walmart gun at 25 yards.

Yeah, I didn't think it was too bad, but it opened up pretty wide after just a few more shots.  I just have a hunch it could be better with different pellets.  Especially because just a few days before I made a sub-dime sized group with my Vantage NP, and I wouldn't expect that to be that much nicer of a gun.

If I could get half an inch I'd be happy.
Remington Vantage NP .177 (JM molly paste, JM Seal, GRT-III trigger blade and polished sears, polished and buttoned piston, brass pivot washer mod, CPHP 4-16x40AO)

Beeman RS2 Silver Kodiak X2 .177/.22(JM molly paste and tar, polished sears, trigger over-travel stop, custom scope stop, polished and buttoned piston, included 4x32 scope)

Offline Hoosier Daddy

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #10 on: June 30, 2017, 06:39:21 PM »
Try the RWS super domes
Pistols
Crosman: PC77, 1740
Benjiman H9A

Rifles
Air Arms: S400-SL Carbine FAC
Beeman: RS2 Silver Kodiak,
Benjamin: 312, 342, 392P, 392PA, Maximus
Crosman: Genesis NP .22, Quest 1000X, Raven, 2nd & 3rd var 160's
Feinwerkbau: FWB 300S
Gamo: Recon
SAG: AR2078-B, QB58
Sheridan: C Blue Streak, C9 Blue Streak, Model F Co2
Xisico: XS60C .22, Sentry 702-3 .22

Proud Member of F.U.G.L.Y.

Offline SagaciousKJB

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #11 on: June 30, 2017, 06:57:09 PM »
Try the RWS super domes

Yeah I was thinking of trying those, as well as JSB and H&N.  I really wanna give the Predator Polymags a try too since my 2100 loved them, but everything I've read says that the domed pellets do better for longer yard ranges.

I'm kinda torn between trying the H&N Hunting sampler packs, or trying their FTT and Baracuda pack.  I can only find the FTT pack in .177 so I figure I'll just get to it later, because I really want to find something the .22 barrel likes.

These pellet prices sure add up quick though...  Feel like I need to try one manufacturer's sample pack at a time. More costly in the long run, but otherwise I'm gonna be dumping $40-$50 into pellets, and I can't afford that sadly. One manufacturer's sample pack + shipping is gonna run me about $20.

Could be worse...  Could be shooting a powder burner  ;D
Remington Vantage NP .177 (JM molly paste, JM Seal, GRT-III trigger blade and polished sears, polished and buttoned piston, brass pivot washer mod, CPHP 4-16x40AO)

Beeman RS2 Silver Kodiak X2 .177/.22(JM molly paste and tar, polished sears, trigger over-travel stop, custom scope stop, polished and buttoned piston, included 4x32 scope)

Offline Hoosier Daddy

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #12 on: June 30, 2017, 07:14:50 PM »
This guy has got your back....
http://www.straightshooters.com/straight-shooters-full-pellet-sampler-.22.html
* JSB GTO Lead Free 11.75 gr
* H&N  Baracuda Green 12.65 gr
* Crosman Premier 14.30 gr
* JSB Exact Express 14.35 gr
* RWS SuperDome 14.50 gr
* Vortex Supreme 14.66 gr
* H&N Field Target Trophy (FTT) 14.66 gr
* Beeman Field Target Special Copper (FTS) 14.72 gr
* H&N Field Target Trophy (FTT) Power 14.66 gr
* JSB Exact 15.90 gr
* Air Arms Diabolo Field 16.00 gr
* Air Arms Diabolo Field Heavy 18.00 gr
* JSB Exact Heavy 18.13 gr
* H&N Baracuda Hunter Extreme 19.09 gr
* H&N Baracuda 21.14 gr
* H&N Baracuda Match  21.14 gr
* H&N Baracuda Power 21.14 gr
* Beeman Kodiak 21.14 gr

He also has 2 kits of 177 samplers as well  ;)
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 07:17:21 PM by Hoosier Daddy »
Pistols
Crosman: PC77, 1740
Benjiman H9A

Rifles
Air Arms: S400-SL Carbine FAC
Beeman: RS2 Silver Kodiak,
Benjamin: 312, 342, 392P, 392PA, Maximus
Crosman: Genesis NP .22, Quest 1000X, Raven, 2nd & 3rd var 160's
Feinwerkbau: FWB 300S
Gamo: Recon
SAG: AR2078-B, QB58
Sheridan: C Blue Streak, C9 Blue Streak, Model F Co2
Xisico: XS60C .22, Sentry 702-3 .22

Proud Member of F.U.G.L.Y.

Offline SagaciousKJB

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #13 on: June 30, 2017, 08:22:42 PM »
This guy has got your back....
http://www.straightshooters.com/straight-shooters-full-pellet-sampler-.22.html
* JSB GTO Lead Free 11.75 gr
* H&N  Baracuda Green 12.65 gr
* Crosman Premier 14.30 gr
* JSB Exact Express 14.35 gr
* RWS SuperDome 14.50 gr
* Vortex Supreme 14.66 gr
* H&N Field Target Trophy (FTT) 14.66 gr
* Beeman Field Target Special Copper (FTS) 14.72 gr
* H&N Field Target Trophy (FTT) Power 14.66 gr
* JSB Exact 15.90 gr
* Air Arms Diabolo Field 16.00 gr
* Air Arms Diabolo Field Heavy 18.00 gr
* JSB Exact Heavy 18.13 gr
* H&N Baracuda Hunter Extreme 19.09 gr
* H&N Baracuda 21.14 gr
* H&N Baracuda Match  21.14 gr
* H&N Baracuda Power 21.14 gr
* Beeman Kodiak 21.14 gr

He also has 2 kits of 177 samplers as well  ;)

Yeah I was checking out that one first, but the shipping cost...  Ouch.  I only saw one of the .177 packs, but I could swear I saw one that was mostly hollowpoints?
Remington Vantage NP .177 (JM molly paste, JM Seal, GRT-III trigger blade and polished sears, polished and buttoned piston, brass pivot washer mod, CPHP 4-16x40AO)

Beeman RS2 Silver Kodiak X2 .177/.22(JM molly paste and tar, polished sears, trigger over-travel stop, custom scope stop, polished and buttoned piston, included 4x32 scope)

Offline Hoosier Daddy

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #14 on: June 30, 2017, 08:41:05 PM »
There used to be two in 177, now I only see one as well.  :-\
Pistols
Crosman: PC77, 1740
Benjiman H9A

Rifles
Air Arms: S400-SL Carbine FAC
Beeman: RS2 Silver Kodiak,
Benjamin: 312, 342, 392P, 392PA, Maximus
Crosman: Genesis NP .22, Quest 1000X, Raven, 2nd & 3rd var 160's
Feinwerkbau: FWB 300S
Gamo: Recon
SAG: AR2078-B, QB58
Sheridan: C Blue Streak, C9 Blue Streak, Model F Co2
Xisico: XS60C .22, Sentry 702-3 .22

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Offline SagaciousKJB

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #15 on: June 30, 2017, 09:23:27 PM »
There used to be two in 177, now I only see one as well.  :-\

Yeah, I thought I saw a hunter's pack of them long ago too.

That's one nice thing about the H&N sampler, they have the FTT and Baracuda, but also a hunting pack with hollow points and the Silver Arrow. I think for the ranges I want to shoot, though, I'm probably just better off sticking with domes anyway.
Remington Vantage NP .177 (JM molly paste, JM Seal, GRT-III trigger blade and polished sears, polished and buttoned piston, brass pivot washer mod, CPHP 4-16x40AO)

Beeman RS2 Silver Kodiak X2 .177/.22(JM molly paste and tar, polished sears, trigger over-travel stop, custom scope stop, polished and buttoned piston, included 4x32 scope)

Offline Dave99

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #16 on: July 01, 2017, 09:11:39 AM »
As you try different pellets, be sure to clean the CP schmutz from the bore!  Seems like the Chinese Beeman steel and Crosman pellet alloy are made for each other, with an unhealthy coating developing fairly quickly.  And you've put quite a few Crosman's through the barrel.

I had looked at the pellet samplers quite a bit too.  I ended up with the RWS based on tins of two types of Crosmans, another brand I can't remember, and the RWS superdomes.  Nothing worked well until I cleaned the barrel.  Then the RWS gave me tight enough groups that I stopped looking.  I'm 100% certain that any remaining spread in groups is just the way I interact with the Beeman.

BTW: once the action is reasonable, the next tough part is the travel AFTER the full break.  Another poster here has a good series of pictures on reducing this.  Better follow-through is thoroughly demonstrated to equate with tighter groups.  Here's the link: https://www.gatewaytoairguns.org/GTA/index.php?topic=64509.msg676471#msg676471
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:23:03 AM by Dave99 »
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Offline PaulT58

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #17 on: July 01, 2017, 10:44:17 AM »
Good to know about the gunk!  I have put quite a few CPHPs through my barrels also, may be time for a good cleaning!

I also saw an interesting video on YouTube about sighting in both barrels and having them hold zero!  I thought this would be impossible till I saw this guys solution!  Yep, he suggested a second scope!  Sight both in to their own barrel and just swap barrel and scope at the same time when going to a different caliber!  He claims the scope stop ensures scope placement at the exact same spot which will maintain zero!  Simply Genius! 
  • Navarre, FL
AIRGUNS:
Benjamin Mrod, Prod & Synrod .22 & .25
Benjamin Trail NP2 .22
Evanix Air Speed .22
Gamo Whisper Fusion .177
Hatsan Torpedo 100X .25
Hatsan BullBoss .22
Hatsan AT44S-10 .177
Nova-Vista Liberty .177
Sam Yang Sumatra 2500 .25
SPA PR900W (Varmint) .22
Umarex Gauntlet .22

FOR SALE:
AirMax Plinkster .22 w/1/2-20 UNF LDC Adapter Single Shot Tray and 2 Magazines - $75 + Shipping

Offline SagaciousKJB

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #18 on: July 01, 2017, 02:13:22 PM »
As you try different pellets, be sure to clean the CP schmutz from the bore!  Seems like the Chinese Beeman steel and Crosman pellet alloy are made for each other, with an unhealthy coating developing fairly quickly.  And you've put quite a few Crosman's through the barrel.

I had looked at the pellet samplers quite a bit too.  I ended up with the RWS based on tins of two types of Crosmans, another brand I can't remember, and the RWS superdomes.  Nothing worked well until I cleaned the barrel.  Then the RWS gave me tight enough groups that I stopped looking.  I'm 100% certain that any remaining spread in groups is just the way I interact with the Beeman.

BTW: once the action is reasonable, the next tough part is the travel AFTER the full break.  Another poster here has a good series of pictures on reducing this.  Better follow-through is thoroughly demonstrated to equate with tighter groups.  Here's the link: https://www.gatewaytoairguns.org/GTA/index.php?topic=64509.msg676471#msg676471

Good point! I didn't even think about cleaning the barrel.  I need to go pick up some more Otis patches. I don't think I've ever cleaned the barrels. Closest to it is putting a coat of oil in them for winter storage.

I noticed that screw as well and wasn't really sure what it was for. It just stops the trigger from over-traveling?  Looks easy enough, I just gotta get a tap and a screw. Thankfully there's a place in town I should be able to buy them just the screw, drill and tap instead of having to buy a whole set.  Then again, I always wanted a tap and die set....   This is where my money goes :P

PaulT58,

Yeah I thought about doing that too actually! I use markers to mark where my scope mounts are, and then I take a machinist's scribe and mark the very edge of the mounts so I know exactly where they were on the rail.  The zero does hold pretty well!

My solution was going to be to zero in with the .177, and then note where the scope settings are on my turrets and swap to the .22.  Then I'd zero it, write the turret numbers again, and that way I'd know roughly how much to adjust whenever I switch from one barrel to the other.

The only problem is that it doesn't seem to really hold zero very well even when you take out the barrel and put the same barrel back in.  That set screw has to be torqued down TIGHT and I think to have consistency it'd be best to tighten with a torque wrench.


Oh also Dave, you were right about that travel-adjustment being one dangerous little guy.  I've been trying to take it up just to the point where it would bump fire and then back it off.  I was testing last night, cocked it, and didn't even get the barrel closed before "BANG!" and I had to clean my drawers.

So I have it backed off pretty good now, making sure it won't bump fire with a hefty whack on the butt stock with a rubber mallet. It's not nearly as short a pull, but I feel better about the safety of it.


Kind of disappointed I've already went through 2 dry-fires since this tune-up :/  That's gotta be bad for the seal...
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 02:29:17 PM by SagaciousKJB »
Remington Vantage NP .177 (JM molly paste, JM Seal, GRT-III trigger blade and polished sears, polished and buttoned piston, brass pivot washer mod, CPHP 4-16x40AO)

Beeman RS2 Silver Kodiak X2 .177/.22(JM molly paste and tar, polished sears, trigger over-travel stop, custom scope stop, polished and buttoned piston, included 4x32 scope)

Offline Dave99

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Re: My Silver Kodiak is a whole new beast
« Reply #19 on: July 01, 2017, 04:33:00 PM »

Oh also Dave, you were right about that travel-adjustment being one dangerous little guy.  I've been trying to take it up just to the point where it would bump fire and then back it off.  I was testing last night, cocked it, and didn't even get the barrel closed before "BANG!" and I had to clean my drawers.

So I have it backed off pretty good now, making sure it won't bump fire with a hefty whack on the butt stock with a rubber mallet. It's not nearly as short a pull, but I feel better about the safety of it.

Kind of disappointed I've already went through 2 dry-fires since this tune-up :/  That's gotta be bad for the seal...

Glad you got away from the bump firing!  Any way you can do that with a pellet in the chamber? Maybe a good pellet trap fairly near the muzzle, with the rifle on bags, whacking the shoulder area with a mallet?

BTW: remember on this model, if you pull the trigger part way, even if you CAN push it back and reset the safety, the sear position doesn't change, and bump fire risk goes up... once you start to pull the trigger either go all the way on target, or finish shooting the round into the dirt or other non-ricochet/shot damage direction.
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How do you word it... "Air Guns" or "AirGuns"?