Crosman Models = Confusion!



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Offline Stacker

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Crosman Models = Confusion!
« on: December 13, 2010, 02:09:53 PM »
I'm looking for a nitro piston rifle, (either .177 or .22) that is easy to cock and has an adjustable trigger. I intend to use it for back yard pest control out to 30 yards.

 I am considering the following Crosman models: Titan GP, Venom NP, Vantage NP. However, I cant find enough info so I can compare cocking effort, etc. Do these models have the same internals, or are they really different inside?

Based on your experience, which is the easiest to cock?

Thanks for any info that you may care to pass along!

Joe.

Brooks P

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Re: Crosman Models = Confusion!
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2010, 03:38:52 PM »
Here is some information on the Venom http://www.gatewaytoairguns.org/GTA/index.php?topic=857.0. Basically a Benjamin Trail NP with the Phantom stock – made for and sold by Sportsman’s Guide.

I can’t find a Vantage NP, Remington has a Vantage but it is a powerful .177 Springer, not a NP. Max velocity for this gun is reported at 1200 ft/sec, although that is undoubtedly an optimistic figure with anything but ultra-light pellets.

If you click on “Click for specifications” on this page for the Crosman Titan NP http://www.pyramydair.com/s/m/Crosman_Titan_Nitro_Piston_Air_Rifle/2290, you will see that the cocking effort is stated as 31 lbs.

The Benjamin Trail NP XL http://www.pyramydair.com/s/m/Benjamin_Trail_NP_XL/2052 states under “Click for specifications” that cocking effort is 47 lbs. The standard Benjamin Trail NP (.22) http://www.pyramydair.com/s/m/Benjamin_Trail_NP_Nitro_Piston_Hardwood_air_rifle/2050 states that the cocking effort is 33 lbs.

The cocking effort for the Remington NP and NP XL is not listed on PA’s site but a search found one reference to 29 lbs for the Remington NP, but there are a number of posts on the Internet saying that the actually effort is higher, and much higher (50 lbs) for the NPXL.

I have a new Diana 34 and the cocking effort is stated as 30 lbs on PA. Both my Daughter and I have some difficulty cocking this rifle and we both think it requires more effort than 30 lbs. Yeah I’m 67, but I’m in pretty good shape, although overweight at 250 lbs for my six foot frame. The problem both of us have is the butt of the rifle digging in to our body when we cock the rifle.

Offline northern lights

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Re: Crosman Models = Confusion!
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2010, 04:25:58 PM »
The benjamin legacy se is the lightest cocking effort of the nirto piston. Thet claim a 16 lb cocking effort. That about as easy as it gets. Gun is 22cal shoots 620 fps 43.8 inch 6lb 15 ounces. Would love to have one in 177 cal. Gun should be a good shooter out to 30 yd,s. Trigger is adjustable an charlie trigger will fit.

Online Rocker1

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Re: Crosman Models = Confusion!
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2010, 06:36:34 PM »
I have a remington npss  and it is the easyest cocking ag I own and if you compare it to the xl1500 I have, cocking effort is effortless. mine is 177 and shoots 930s. Thanks David
HW97  GENE BUILT MULTI SHOT DISCO EVANIX AR6 CZ200  TITAN 2X1377 RWS 45  BENJAMINE 392 REMINGTON NPSS  G1 EXTREME RWS 35 GENES R11 I HAVE HID FROM HIM REMINGTON SUMMIT gas rammed PHANTOM  Bsa lonestar 25 crosman quest CZS200 BT65 TURKEY GUN B26 WINCHESTER 850 2XSX60          CROSSMAN VENOM

Offline Stacker

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Re: Crosman Models = Confusion!
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2010, 09:58:59 PM »
Brooks, you really "hit the books" looking for info!! I followed your trail and got an education! Crossman does some funny things with their model designations. There are TWO versions at PA of the Titan GP: the "Titan GP" with a listed cocking efort of 21 lbs and a MV in .22 cal of 695 fps. They also list a "Titan GP NP" with a listed cocking effort of 31 lbs and a MV of 950 fps. Makes sense, more cocking effort = more stored energy = more MV.

Northern Lights, the Legacy SE is not listed by A of A, PA, etc. The Crosman site does list it, but it's currently not available. With a 16 lb cocking effort, the .22 has a listed MV of 620 fps. Again, the cocking effort and MV fall into place in the scheme of things.

31# cocking effort ~ 950 fps
21# cocking effort ~ 695 fps
16# cocking effort ~ 620 fps

Rocker 1, at PA, I entered "XL1500" in their search box and came up with a Benjamin Trail NP XL. The cocking effort is listed as 47 lbs! Probabily a flawed data entry by PA. I cant imagine anyone considering 47 lbs as "light cocking". ;D Did I goof by entering the wrong number??

Anyway, all of your input is appreciated and will help me make a decision. Right now, I'm leaning toward the Titan GP with 21# cocking effort. It sounds like it'll make a nice rifle for critter control

Joe.

 

Offline Stacker

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Re: Crosman Models = Confusion!
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2010, 10:05:45 PM »
Looked at PA data again on the XL 1500, and they list .177 MV at 1500 fps ..... gotta be the wrong rifle I'm looking at.

Joe.

Brooks P

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Re: Crosman Models = Confusion!
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2010, 10:29:16 PM »
Looked at PA data again on the XL 1500, and they list .177 MV at 1500 fps ..... gotta be the wrong rifle I'm looking at.

Joe.

That sounds about right for light-weight pellets.

Straight Shooters lists a 725, 1100, and 1500 Benjamin Trail rifles.

Trail NP Hardwood .22 Caliber
The Trail NP Hardwood features a handsome, checkered, hardwood stock.  The imposing 23 ft-lbs of muzzle energy provides 16% more downrange energy than .177 cal., and features velocities of up to 950 fps*.

Trail NP XL 1500 .177 Caliber
The XL1500 features a handsome, checkered, hardwood stock. With its daunting 24 ft-lbs of muzzle energy, and shot velocities of up to 1500 fps*, small game – it’s game over.

Trail NP XL 1100 .22 Caliber
The Trail NP XL1100 features a handsome, checkered, hardwood stock.  The stunning 30 ft-lbs of muzzle energy, and shot velocities of up to 1100 fps* make this the ultimate choice for successful small game hunting.

Trail NP XL 725 .25 Caliber
With 30 ft-lbs of muzzle energy, and velocities of up to 800 fps (using alloy pellets), the fearsome NEW XL725 provides 24% more downrange energy than a .177 caliber offers. This is the most powerful Nitro Piston break barrel available.

Cocking effort is listed as heavy for all models - http://www.straightshooters.com/benjaminsheridan/trail-np-rifles.html

R&L Airgun Supply, http://www.rlairgunsupply.com/cart/products/Benjamin_Trail_NP_XL_177_Cal-472-62.html, doesn’t mention cocking but does list 1500fps for the .177 Trail NP XL.

Of the Crosman made rifles with NPs the U.S. made Remington’s are reported to be the best. I can’t personally speak to that claim, but I was considering the Remington before I settled for the new Diana 34 Classic. I decided I didn’t need that much power for my purposes, and actually would have preferred something along the lines of the HW50S from Weihrauch with its 574 fps muzzle velocity (.22 cal), but $379.95 was/is out of my price range at the moment. Weihrauch, same as the German made Beemans, are amoung the cream of the crop – but they are all Springers IMHO.

How do you word it... "Air Guns" or "AirGuns"?